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July 26, 2017 By Scott Simone

4 Memes that Perfectly Describe Meetings

July 26, 2017

By Scott Simone

Read More from Scott Simone

July 26, 2017

4 Memes that Perfectly Describe Meetings

By Scott Simone
Contributor

“I can’t wait for today’s 2 o’clock meeting!” is a phrase you’ll hear almost as often as “That root canal was a blast!” Because, well, lets face it: meetings can often be nothing more than a time-sucking killjoy.

And nothing can encapsulate our 21st-century feelings (trust us, we know your pain) about meetings better than memes. But alas, along with each of these Internet representations of our inner suffering, we’re going to throw you a few tips that will change your “ugh” to an “aah.”

Image result for memes about meetings

We’ve all been here: walking into a meeting knowing we have all of nothing to offer, and that we’ll be sitting in silence for whatever amount of time is designated for the meeting. Well, you can save yourself from this energy-depleting scenario. All it takes is a few minutes of prep.

Start out by reading the meeting agenda. What’s the overall subject being discussed? And how does your specific role fit into what’s being talked about? Then, use a fun little exercise: Think of all the little things you’d complain about to your work spouse regarding the meeting’s topic and your role. Put a less sassy spin on them, and formulate them into actionable questions and suggestions about how the team can better accomplish certain goals.And there you have it—talking points for your upcoming meeting. If you really can’t think of anything, determine if you should even be in the meeting at all and discuss your role with the meeting host.

https://www.mememaker.net/static/images/memes/3819393.jpg

This is a perfectly valid question. With all of the collaborative tools at our disposal these days, are most meetings necessary? The answer, quite simply, is no.

For the small things—think completion of tasks, questions around processes, putting together sales decks—tackle those using platforms like Google Docs, iDoneThis, Trello, or, you know, the age-old email. These platforms keep things buzzing along, and allows for tracking tasks. If you see things aren’t getting done, that’s when you can call a meeting. Which brings me to my next point: Leave meetings for the big-picture problem solving and ideation. If you have fewer meetings tackling larger issues—think along the lines of ineffective processes or unrealistic goals—it gives team members time and incentive to come better prepared and with better ideas.

All too many a meeting has been wasted by ineffective—and unclear—goal setting. What do we mean by this? Well, the meeting went swimmingly. Everyone participated, good ideas were exchanged, and everybody was feeling good. But then the meeting wraps. John brought up the idea of adding more benchmark numbers to the sales deck. Does that mean he’s going to tackle that? If so, by when?

If this is how your meeting ends, it was a grade-A waste of time. If everyone leaves unclear of who’s doing what and when, what was the purpose of it all? First off, check that everyone is aligned and agrees to tasks presented during the meeting. The folks over at the Harvard Business Review suggest using the phrase: “Do X by Y.” If you default to leaving the deadline to your next meeting, there’s a good chance it’s not getting done. You should also be explicit in delegating the task, and following up with said person after the meeting.

Image result for memes about meetings

Nobody wants to come off as dumb. But sometimes it’s pertinent to ask questions—no matter how small. For a more artful approach to querying, the experts at Forbes suggest the Google rule: if you can quickly look up the information being spoken about, don’t derail the conversation with a question about it. And, perhaps most important to all attendees, rambling on after asking a question is a great way to come across as incoherent and babbling. Instead, stop at the question mark, as Forbes puts it. Ask your question, and wait for it to be answered. Trust us, everyone will be thankful.

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